FOOD+DRNK Culinary Art ‘2015

In the case of Thailand, these words come to mind: intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor. Sticky rice, not jasmine rice, is the staple food in the local cuisines of Northern Thailand and of Isan (Northeastern Thailand), both regions of Thailand directly adjacent to Laos with which they share many cultural traits. Meats used in Thai cuisine are usually pork and chicken, and also duck, beef, and water buffalo. Janer (2008) observes that this sharing of the same plato nacional by different countries calls into question the idea that every country has a unique national dish that is special to that country; she states that cuisine does not respect national and geopolitical borders. They often feature as a garnish, especially with one-dish meals.

Some westerners think it's a jumble of flavours, but to a Thai that's important, it's the complexity they delight in". Goat and mutton are rarely eaten except by Muslim Thais. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter and spicy.

The most notable influence from the West must be the introduction of the chili pepper from the Americas in the 16th or 17th century. When time is limited or when eating alone, single dishes, such as fried rice or noodle soups, are quick and filling. Very often, regular restaurants will also feature a selection of freshly made "rice curry" dishes on their menu for single customers. "princely rice"). With over 40 distinct ethnic groups each with its own culture and even more languages,[25] it comes as no surprise that Thai cuisine, as a whole, features many different ingredients (suan phasom; Thai: ส่วนผสม), and ways of preparing food. Stir fried noodle dishes such as pad Thai, and curry-noodle dishes such as khanom chin nam ngiao, are also eaten with a fork and spoon in the Thai fashion. Very often, regular restaurants will also feature a selection of freshly made "rice curry" dishes on their menu for single customers. Both Peru and Ecuador claim ceviche as their national dish. According to Zilkia Janer, a lecturer on Latin American culture at Hofstra University, it is impossible to choose a single national dish, even unofficially, for countries such as Mexico, because of their diverse ethnic populations and cultures.[3] The cuisine of such countries simply cannot be represented by any single, national dish.